Photonic Science Limited

Scientific Detector Systems

Contact
RSSPrint

French office: Tel 00 33 (0) 4 76 93 57 20  |   Head office UK: Tel 00 44 (0) 1580 881199

info@photonic-science.co.uk

Combined SAXS / WAXS System

A new SAXS/WAXS X-Ray camera with a nominal working aperture of 260 mm diameter.

Tapers are ground in-house, cutting the corner radius of one of the 150mm diameter taper quadrants. When the four tapers are assembled together, the radii on each central corner of the tapers form a central perforation of 18mm diameter, through which X-Rays pass to the SAX detector.

The 150mm taper has a magnification ratio of 3.5:1.

The combined quadrant taper assemblies. Mounted and aligned prior to having phosphor coating applied. Note that the dead area that is lost at the segment joints is less than 1mm wide.

The exit interface is furnished with ?0? ring seal and mounting holes for the SAXS detector.

 

Combined SAXS / WAXS System

Combined SAXS / WAXS System

Rugged ICCD works at zero G

New Miniature ICCD camera in zero-G conditions aboard an ESA Airbus.

Thirty zero-G sessions were accomplished during the flight, each lasting approximately 30 seconds.

This picture shows the interior of the Airbus with PSL Director Patricia Tomkins in free fall. Each experiment aboard the flight is packaged as it would be on a satellite launch, and runs automatically.

The PSL experiment, designed with the collaboration of the Phillips University (Marburg), studies the behaviour of osteoblasts in zero-G conditions.

Following the successful trials aboard the Airbus, the experiment may now be included in a satellite or shuttle payload for more extensive running.

Rugged ICCD works at zero G

Rugged ICCD works at zero G

Cellular activity in microgravity

The fourth in the series of parabolic zero-g flights researching cellular activity in microgravity.

Each experiment aboard the flight is packaged as it would be on a satellite launch, and runs automatically. The system is compact and battery-powered.

The PSL experiment, designed with the collaboration of the Phillips University (Marburg), studies the behaviour of osteoblasts in zero-G conditions.

A central controller of cellular activity is the metal ion calcium. It is possible that calcium ion regulation of biochemical activity was one of the first control systems when life started.

Some years ago it was found that, among the hormonal controls of osteoblasts, mechanical feedback was partially regulated by intracellular calcium. Mechanical feedback in bone increases strength when loaded and decreases strength when not loaded ? As in osteoporosis ? Which can affect astronauts.

Cellular activity in microgravity

Cellular activity in microgravity


Photonic Science Limited - Scientific detector systems